Long life to the Otterhound!

Full of love and hard to find

Looking for a clownish and uncommon canine companion? You may set your heart on the Otterhound! Rarer than the giant panda and the white rhino, there are fewer than 1,000 Otterhounds left in the world and about 300 are in Britain.

Originally bred to take the fish kept as food stock from Otters, this eye-catching and shaggy-looking hound is now described as a big friendly dog with a mind on his own. Keen on meeting this funny fellow? Watch Hugo, an eight and a half years old Otterhound in the video and save the date for our October Eukanuba Discover Dogs event.

 

Join us at Discover Dogs

Easy-going and amiable

They are lovely dogs with a good temperament, playful and affectionate with their family. Although, they are independent and not as demanding as other dogs, after good greeting they will return to the joy of napping.

Drawing attention on its rarity

Statistics speak for themselves! The number of Otterhound puppies registered annually in the UK has been declining over a number of years. Looking to meet these scruffy puppies? Come talk to breeders at our Eukanuba Discover Dogs event this October.

Vulnerable native breed

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Watchdog but not guard dog

His bark is worse than his bite! Very suited for guard duties (he seems to love the sound of his loud voice), he’s far too friendly to be a good watchdog. 

The class clown

Shambling along with a furry smile and klutzy manners, the Otterhound has an inner talent for making people laugh. No wonder why so many fans are devoted to this breed and enjoy him so much. However, hundred pounds of bouncy personality can be too rowdy for toddlers and too boisterous for frail seniors.

Born to be a swimmer

Originally bred to hunt otters, his main function was to dive into water. Also built to gallop when on land, he longs for outdoorsy activities. Attention! With their inclination for slobbering and tracking mud with their webbed feet, they are not a good match for OCD housekeepers!

Training? Keep going!

Stubborn but yet soft, he will be slow to obey but will be good-natured about it. Because of its large size, training is absolutely necessary, so avoid harsh methods and keep the training bit positive and fun for both of you.

A nose on four legs

A leash or secure fence is a must at all times! The nose of this great hunter is exquisitely sensitive so expect him to investigate his surroundings and find new exciting scents. Options? A few Otterhounds are let of the lead but you need to be in a very safe area and the majority are to be kept on flexi lead and they are quite happy with that. Beware, with his powerful hunting instincts, smaller pets are not always safe.

Looking for tips and advice from experienced owners and breeders?